“Re: What was your Motivation?” by Dave – 8.27.21

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Entry Submitted by Dave at 2:56 PM EDT on August 27, 2021

“What was your Motivation?” by Scott – 8.26.21

Scott: Regarding “ Zim, what was your motivation? Was it to make a lot of money like the RV people? Or, was it to do a great work among the people to help them become heathier, happier, more prosperous, and more secure? ”What’s wrong with someone possessing both motivations?

Scott, this a great question. I’ll offer my perspective, but first, let me back up and look at the context of the questions I asked that you used as the basis for your question.

One of the things I noticed over the past several months following the Dinar Chronicles is the misunderstanding of the difference between the Revaluation of Currencies (RV) and the Zim Redemption for Humanitarian Projects (HP).

The RV “gurus” have lumped them into the same category, indicating that Zim can be exchanged for money like the Dinar and Dong can, which is completely false. However, many people who believe the RV “gurus” didn’t know the difference, so they bought Zim instead of Dinar and/or Dong for the RV, hoping to make money by doing so.

In trying to purify the muddy waters, I’ve offered my perspective on the difference between the RV and Zim, so Zim holders would know the actual position they’re in and can thereby make better decisions based on more accurate expectations.

Accordingly, the questions I asked above about a person’s motivation for purchasing Zim were not judgment questions; they were expectation and strategy questions. I was not suggesting that one motivation was better than the other. I was suggesting that a person’s strategy should be based on what they’re trying to accomplish.

Now, let’s look at your question: What’s wrong with someone possessing both motivations?

Absolutely nothing! In fact, I believe that regardless of the motivation for purchasing Dinar/Dong/Zim, all purchasers have both motivations.

For example, the person who wants to make a few million on the RV will certainly want to help family and friends to some degree. And, similarly, those who are true humanitarians also want money to live life to the fullest themselves in addition to helping a lot of people.

So, let’s go back to the context of my original questions. The order of priority of these two motivations makes all the difference from a strategy standpoint.

If making money is your top priority and helping people is secondary, then the correct strategy (between the two strategies of purchasing real, genuine currencies for RV exchange or purchasing defunct Zim currency for redemption) would be to purchase Dinar and/or Dong, not Zim because (1) with Zim, you can’t exchange it; and (2) because the Zim was specifically set aside for humanitarian projects, if you don’t have one, you won’t get any money.

If, on the other hand, helping people is your top priority and having money is secondary, then purchasing Zim for redemption is the correct strategy because you’ll get so much more money that you can use to help people whereas with the RV you won’t get much money to do a lot of the good you want to do.

Does that make any sense?

Hopefully it does.

One more thing: When the war is over, the Alliance will flood the earth with great wealth to raise the abundance and prosperity of all people. Yes, the money will flow through the HP, but it will eventually bless all people so that all people will be wildly wealthy. In the end, what’s there to worry about?

FWIW

Dave

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