The Survival Economist: Bank Runs in China Caused by a Sudden Surge in Liquidity Concerns

0
535

The Survival Economist
Premiered February 20, 2022

“China’s banking sector has been dogged by a sudden surge in liquidity concerns”. Where have we heard that before? It’s crazy to keep any significant amount of money in a bank. They pay virtually no interest anyway.

First, it was Baoshang Bank , then it was Bank of Jinzhou, then, two months ago, China’s Heng Feng Bank with 1.4 trillion yuan in assets, quietly failed and was just as quietly nationalized.

This Month, a fourth prominent Chinese bank was on the verge of collapse under the weight of its bad loans, only this time the failure was far less quiet, as depositors of the rural lender swarmed the bank’s retail outlets, demanding their money in an angry demonstration of what Beijing is terrified of the most: a bank run!

Life tragedy mostly happened suddenly, overnight, with no warning. However, the bank run has plenty of warnings for those who can see and paying attention. Disasters are for those who refuse to see and living in limbo. We will pay for letting the government and central bank greed control our lives. Cartels will go free and enjoy the fruit of our labor, while more will be poorer and starve. They have our money converted to physical assets while we are left with federal reserve promissory notes.

Liquidity problems in China, Liquidity problems in America. Only one thing to do. Buy gold bitchez. Stick to physical, not that ETF nonsense. If you don’t hold it, you don’t own it. The exit doors are narrow, and everyone thinks they will be able to get out. I have no sympathy for anyone who continues to hold their nest egg in the banks in the face of such obvious financial Armageddon forthcoming. The peasants are stupid, thinking their cash is in the bank.

Welcome to The Atlantis Report.

Small Bank Collapse Triggers Credit Crunch in China. A growing number of analysts believe the next financial crisis is likely to start from China and its indebted banking system. A recent incident substantiates these fears.

Baoshang, a small lender based in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, collapsed at the end of May, despite its numbers from a few weeks has given no indication that this was going to happen.

According to its most recent report filed with financial authorities, the bank registered a $600 million profit in 2017. It also had approximately $90 billion in assets, while its bad loans were under 2%. But then Baoshang suddenly failed, and Chinese regulators seized the bank – the first act of this kind in the People’s Republic this century – quickly blaming its owner of misappropriation of funds.

Observers note, however, that the significance of Baoshang’s collapse stems from the fact that it was caused by the country’s first default on interbank obligations. It has since become tough for smaller institutions to access the interbank lending market, on which they are heavily reliant. And while the collapse of an Inner Mongolian bank may not sound like a Lehman-size event, in China, quantity has a quality all of its own. Numerous small and medium-sized Chinese banks combined are, in fact as large as the big players.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQU76V52XIs

______________________________________________________

If you wish to contact the author of any reader submitted guest post, you can give us an email at UniversalOm432Hz@gmail.com and we’ll forward your request to the author.
______________________________________________________

All articles, videos, and images posted on Dinar Chronicles were submitted by readers and/or handpicked by the site itself for informational and/or entertainment purposes.

Dinar Chronicles is not a registered investment adviser, broker dealer, banker or currency dealer and as such, no information on the website should be construed as investment advice. We do not support, represent or guarantee the completeness, truthfulness, accuracy, or reliability of any content or communications posted on this site. Information posted on this site may or may not be fictitious. We do not intend to and are not providing financial, legal, tax, political or any other advice to readers of this website.

Copyright © 2021 Dinar Chronicles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here